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Craft Champions

What our craft champions have to say

 

Meet the cultural luminaries who believe Craft Matters, and find out why craft is important to them.

Linda Barker

Linda Barker


Interior designer and TV presenter

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Beautiful craft is second to none. It has its own place in the creative world.
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Siobhan Davies CBE

Siobhan Davies CBE


Siobhan Davies Dance Company

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I am intrigued by how crafts artists have re imagined what their work can do beyond, but not forgetful of, their making tradition. I recognise a shared adventure and enquiry with dance. It seems both these practices have tremendous energy at this moment for creative unsettling. I have learnt more about thinking and making through experiencing work created by craft artists. It’s the gaps and tensions between the art forms that liven up my own thinking and provoke me to explore my own work further.
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Sir Mark Jones

Sir Mark Jones


Master of St Cross College, Oxford

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Craft matters to me because the best and most humane design often comes from thinking through doing; from the direct and intuitive understanding of materials that makers acquire through practice.
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Jon Snow

Jon Snow


Journalist and presenter

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Craft is part of our identity as a civilisation. It’s what we do and it’s about us as a people.
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Sheila Teague

Sheila Teague


Jeweller, Wright & Teague

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Making things well is enormously satisfying and it is this craftsmanship that makes the journey from the cerebral to the physical a joy.
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Rosy Greenlees

Rosy Greenlees


Crafts Council Executive Director

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At the Crafts Council, we believe Craft Matters. And Craft Matters to me personally because of the people that make it and the objects themselves – the innovation and skill that is central to the making process, and the beauty and quality of finished work. I believe that everyone in the UK should have the chance to make, see, collect and learn about craft, and for craft to remain a significant part of all our lives.
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Priscilla Carluccio

Priscilla Carluccio


Design retailer & founder of Few and Far

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We need to try to get across the importance of working with and understanding materials, and we must provide a wide market for crafts. Small batch production could be a great way to bring back the manufacturing skills of Britain and enable a wider public to collect.
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Sir Terence Conran

Sir Terence Conran


Designer, restaurateur and retailer

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Craft Certainly Matters: Industry is often spawned by craft people who become successful at making something and need some help and, before they know it, they have a little business which they soon find has to grow to make it financially viable. At least that is what happened to me when I welded my metal frames chairs and table in the 50s. With the worldwide problems of unemployment, the more crafts people who can be encouraged to start up in business the better - especially if they don't forget the uniqueness and quality that made their handmade intelligently designed product desirable.
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Duke of Devonshire

Duke of Devonshire

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Craft matters to me. Supporting makers and encouraging new traditions has always been important to us at Chatsworth, continuing a family habit spanning centuries.
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Joanna Foster CBE

Joanna Foster CBE


Former Chair of Trustees, Crafts Council

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Craft Matters to me in so many ways, both personal and professional. Craft is a feisty, independent-minded, sparky, polished gem. It often (but not always) resists scale in an economy which often seems focussed on little else. It demands the maker’s time and skill and, in turn, commands a price based on that time and skill – and it repays that price through the pleasure of the objects themselves and the knowledge of the time and skill that has produced them. In terms of value, it is true ethical production. But most of all, it matters because of the people – the professional makers who lie at the heart of craft, the public who enjoy making, seeing, buying and learning about it, the future generations who will make continue to make it their own.
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Norman Foster

Norman Foster


Architect and designer

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As Robert Pirsig reminds us, the word technology comes from the Greek technología, which has two roots: téchne an art, skill or craft and -logía the study of something, or the branch of knowledge of a discipline. Throughout history, architecture has married craft and intellect. Although in recent times that marriage has perhaps not always been equal, we need to value craft and celebrate the art of making – everything we use, see or touch, should be made well and no detail should be considered too small.
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Sir Christopher Frayling

Sir Christopher Frayling


Academic, writer and broadcaster

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Craft used to be associated with the past and an Arts and Crafts aesthetic. Today, they are more associated with urban living and interior design. What distinguishes crafts, is the care with which they have been made. The fact that they have been made by one human being for another, the individual 'take', the use of materials and the thoughtfulness and taste of their design, the seriousness, even when they are fun. The crafts can represent an ethical statement, but they needn't. The things that held the crafts back, for all those years, have now gone. That's why a renaissance is happening now.
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Tricia Guild OBE

Tricia Guild OBE


Creative director of Designers Guild

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Craft is an extraordinary thing of wonder; encompassing skill, creativity, artistry and emotion with thought, process, practicality and function. It is one of the purest forms of expression
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Jude Kelly OBE

Jude Kelly OBE


Artistic Director Southbank Centre

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Craft melds skill and ingenuity, and recognizes that we all have a need for beauty in practical purpose.
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Cath Kidston

Cath Kidston


Designer and founder of Cath Kidston

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There has always been a strong craft movement in the UK, but with the recent resurgence in craft and the return to making things by hand there has been an explosion of new talent of all ages. As a nation we seem to have natural style and wit as well as a particular aptitude for taking the traditional and turning it into something new and surprising - there really is some fabulous work emerging at the moment and long may it last!
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Corin Mellor

Corin Mellor


Creative Director of David Mellor Designs

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Making things well is a basic human instinct and a measure of our national creativity
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Michelle Ogundehin

Michelle Ogundehin


Editor, Elle Decoration

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Craft is about the maker, the user, the observer and the future in one. By which I mean it resonates with honesty as the origins of the crafted object are clear and the mark of the hand evident. Craft symbolises utility of purpose and also beauty visualised in simple form. And this is the kind of material future I dream of, one based on universally-appreciated values, a human scale and a desire to be useful. And that’s why Craft matters, possibly more so today than ever.
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Grayson Perry

Grayson Perry


Artist

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One of the great empowering things about learning craft is that it is almost a physical manifestation of ‘I can change the world’.
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Sandi Toksvig

Sandi Toksvig


Broadcaster

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The Danes use the word 'enkelt' to talk about beauty through simplicity. I think craft puts us back in touch with beauty through some of the simplest and ancient methods. It is good for the soul.
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Sir John Tusa

Sir John Tusa


Broadcaster and Journalist

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My own feeling is that engaging with what people make now… that is an incredibly exciting activity
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Jeanette Winterson OBE

Jeanette Winterson OBE


Novelist

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The most satisfying thing a human being can do – and the sexiest – is to make something. Life is about relationship – to each other – and to the material world. Making something is a relationship. The thing about craft, about the making of everyday objects that we can have around us, about the making of objects that are beautiful and/or useful, is that our everyday life is enriched.
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